Smalleye Hammerhead Shark Pictures

 
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Smalleye Hammerhead Shark Photos - Also Known As Golden Hammerhead Shark For Its Distinctive Color

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The Smalleye Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna tudes, also known as the Golden Hammerhead or the Curry Shark, is a little-studied species of small shark found in tropical and subtropical waters of the western Atlantic Ocean, especially along the coasts of Venezuela, Trinidad, Brazil and Uruguay. It has comparatively smaller eyes than other hammerhead species. It has a characteristic gold or orange-yellow color, which some have speculated to be due to carotenoid pigment found in species it preys on, though this link has not been proven. It is often taken as by-catch in shrimp boats, but is not considered commercially important as a species.

The smalleye hammerhead reaches a maximum length of 148 cm (58 in), with average length being closer to 130 cm (51 in). Their size makes them one of the smallest members of the Sphyrnidae family. As do all hammerheads, it has lobes extending from each side of the head, making a mallet shape when seen from above or below. It has a small eye at the end of each lobe, and an indentation at the midpoint of its snout, which is useful in identifying this species. The hammerhead's lobes are where its electroreceptors are located, which are used to help it in locating prey by detecting faint electrical impulses emitted when a prey organism contracts its muscles.

The smalleye hammerhead is mainly found in murky coastal waters at depths of 40 m (131 ft) or less. Pups and juveniles favor shallower waters, and juveniles often school together. It feeds on shrimp, catfish, squid and crabs. It may prey on the pups of other hammerhead species, and in turn, it is preyed upon by larger sharks, such as bull sharks, Carcharhinus leucas, and larger species of hammerhead.

The smalleye hammerhead is viviparous and gives birth to 5-19 live pups after a gestation period of about 10 months.. Trinidad is considered a prime nursery area for this species, but numbers are appearing to decline there, as well as in Venezuela and northern Brazil. As with all sharks, it has a slow reproductive cycle, so even accidental capture can impact its numbers. The IUCN Red List reports its conservation status as Vulnerable.

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picture of a smalleye hammerhead shark picture of shark scientists with smalleye shark picture of underside of smalleye hammerhead shark head picture of a smalleye hammerhead shark

Picture of a head of smalleye or golden hammerhead shark, Sphyrna tudes, Trinidad, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean

Picture #: 008998

Stock photo of shark scientist Dr. Jose Castro with specimen of golden hammerhead, or smalleye hammerhead, Sphyrna tudes, Trinidad, West Indies, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean

Picture #: 004461

Picture of the underside of head of golden or smalleye hammerhead shark, Sphryna tudes, showing teeth and ampullae of Lorenzini

Picture #: 008831

Picture of a smalleye or golden hammerhead shark, Sphyrna tudes, Trinidad, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean

Picture #: 008995

picture of a smalleye hammerhead shark picture of pelvic slaspers of  smalleye shark picture of a smalleye hammerhead shark  

Picture of a head of smalleye or golden hammerhead shark, Sphyrna tudes, Trinidad, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean

Picture #: 008997

Stock photo of the pelvic claspers, the male sex organs of a golden hammerhead, or smalleye hammerhead, Sphyrna tudes

Picture #: 012553

Picture of a golden or smalleye hammerhead shark, Sphryna tudes, Trinidad, Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean

Picture #: 008996

 

 

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